UC Davis Brewing instructor Glen Fox head shot

Glen Fox joined UC Davis in 2019 as the new Anheuser-Busch Endowed Professor of Malting & Brewing Science. With a Ph.D. in the subject of barley genetics as it relates to barley and malt quality, Fox has conducted research with some of the world’s largest beer companies. He is an instructor in UC Davis Continuing and Professional Education’s Master Brewers Certificate Program.

Beer is one of humankind's most important beverages.”

How long have you been working in the brewing industry? 

I have been working in the brewing industry for over 30 years. I started working for an Australian state government barley breeding program, which was breeding new barley varieties for malting quality. We worked closely with malting companies and breweries when new varieties were being commercially tested. This is how I became interested in the importance of malt quality in brewing. 

How did you become interested in brewing? 

Brewing is one of humankind's most important food processes. Some of the scientific discoveries made in brewing underlie the basics of all science. This history, as well as the fact that I just like beer, keep me interested and wanting to learn more about the industry. I'm also very interested in archeological studies on ancient beer recipes.

Why is teaching important to you?

Teaching, whether through undergraduate programs or through continuing education, is critical for us to better place our industry within communities.

How would you describe your teaching style? 

I like to engage with students in open discussions and relate real-world experiences. These real-world examples have hidden aspects you can’t easily find in most textbooks.  

What do you want students to take away from your courses? 

I hope students take away a greater appreciation for one of the key raw materials in beer, namely malt. Its contribution to beer is sometimes overlooked and we can’t let that happen. Let’s just say I want students to understand the magic of malt. 

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